CREATE YOUR SHIRT & CHANGE A LIFE

Inspire Part II

March 11 - March 24

This is the second part of the Inspire campaign. Again, we have a group of extremely talented artists. We hope you enjoy their work as much as we do!

Kelsey is raising money for Coastal Connections, Inc

Coastal Connections Inc. supports people with disabilities to achieve their full potential by creating personalized programs that promote living, working and playing in the community. Each person becomes an essential contributing member of their community through dynamic programs that create an environment which fosters life-long learning.

*We focus on the abilities of students, individuals served and staff, honoring their uniqueness and individuality.

*We offer creative and flexible program development and design that is responsive to needs of stakeholders through partnerships and collaborations.

*Our expectation is to seek and assume leadership roles in every aspect of our organization.

*We live, work, learn and play in the community and our presence in our community is mutually beneficial.

*We take reasonable risks that are of benefit to individuals and the organization.


Logan is raising money for Team Logan

As some of you know, Logan was recently diagnosed with a thyroid disorder. Medication is now a part of his daily life, and exercise is going to be a huge part of our routine moving forward. We are lucky enough to have an empty space in our home that we will be converting into Logan's fitness room, and it will be customized to his needs, likes and limitations. He has spinal issues, and therefore will be working with some specialists to make sure everything is perfectly geared toward his health and safety.


Justin is raising money for Community Outreach Program for the Deaf

Community Outreach Program for the Deaf (COPD) provides services throughout Arizona to persons with a hearing loss. COPD is considered a grassroots organization partnering with Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind persons and organizations in establishing services and providing a "one-stop" center for persons with a hearing loss.

COPD was established in 1973 as the result of grassroots efforts made by Deaf community members. Over the years, COPD has grown to meet the expanding needs of our clients, continually offering new programs and services. Now as part of CCS' Southwest Community Services, COPD is well into it's forth decade, serving hundreds of Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind persons each year. From the very beginning, COPD has maintained strong relationships with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing communities to help determine how we can best meet their needs. We pride ourselves on our strong relationship with these communities and value their guidance and support in creating new programs and services.


Tommy is raising money for The Miracle League of Johnson County

The Miracle League of Johnston County is a baseball league for children with physical, cognitive and/or emotional disabilities.
In 1997, just outside of Atlanta, Rockdale Youth Baseball Association’s coach Eddie Bagwell invited the first child with a disability to play baseball on his team. In 1998, other children with disabilities were invited to play baseball on a typical baseball field within the same baseball complex.

These players and their families expressed a desire to wear uniforms, hit and round the bases just like other team members. And so the Miracle League was born. Since then the Miracle League has received local and national media attention. The league has been chronicled in the local newspaper, televised locally on NBC, ABC, Connecting With Kids and FOX, Atlanta affiliates and nationally on CNN, MSNBC and Fox Sports. In July 2001, the league was profiled on a segment of HBO’s Real Sports.

Presently there are almost 300 Miracle League Organizations across the country including Puerto Rico, Canada and our newest member in Australia. The Miracle League is proud to serve over 200,000 children and young adults with disabilities.


Caleb is raising money for Horse Sense & Sensitivity

“Horse Sense & Sensitivity enhances the life skills and self confidence of special needs people by providing equine-assisted therapeutic programs and services in the Jacksonville Area.”

Horse Sense & Sensitivity is a 501c3 volunteer organization. Volunteers run the board, serve at every lesson as side walkers and leaders, help the organization raise operating funds and maintain the organization. Volunteers and instructors provide care for all horses used in the program. With no paid staff, we have very low overhead so nearly all funds donated go to operations including care and feeding of horses.

Horse Sense & Sensitivity is a non-profit organization that provides facilities and support for therapeutic horseback riding and physical therapy on horseback (hippotherapy.) These services are provided for physically and mentally challenged children and adults in the Jacksonville area.

Our all volunteer Board of Directors is comprised of community members committed to quality horseback riding instruction made available for all including those with special needs.
  • Artist

    Kelsey

    11 yrs old

  • Artist

    Logan

    25 yrs old

  • Artist

    Justin

    38 yrs old

  • Artist

    Tommy

    6 yrs old

  • Artist

    Caleb

    11 yrs old

Kelsey is an amazing young lady. Kelsey has her own set of special medical needs. She is 11-years old this month. As typical as she may seem, Kelsey was born with Biliary Atresia and had life saving surgery at five weeks old. Biliary Atresia is a progressive degenerative disease of the liver and bile ducts. Although the vast majority of BA patients require a liver transplant by the time they’re Kelsey’s age, she is defying the odds and still living with her own liver.

In addition to her BA, Kelsey has had to deal with extremely low bone density. She has had numerous fractures of her wrists, ankles, and foot. Despite all of this, she is an amazing young woman who plays in her school band and rides horses.

It’s hard to find Kelsey without a smile. She has a wonderful spirit that brings smiles to her family and friends.

Logan is a 25-year-old young man who is living with Hashimoto's and developmental disabilities, including Apraxia. He enjoys riding his trike, bowling, fishing, playing basketball and helping with his many, many animals. His family likes to consider him challenged not limited, and you can find out more about him through Logan's mom, Allyson, chronicles their lives on her Facebook page, The Crumb Diaries.
Logan's designs are raising money for Logan's Fund, a trust fund set up to be set aside for Logan should anything happen to his parents.    

Justin is 38 years old and works at a wood shop in a supported vocational program in Tucson, Arizona.  Justin loves to exercise, draw pictures, listen to music, and anything fireman related.  He is close with his family (especially his uncles!) and enjoys spending time with them while rock climbing and canoeing.  Justin has a dog, Koty, and two cats, Jacob Marley and Jordin Sparks.  Justin has a diagnosis of Down Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder but his disability certainly does not define him!!

Tommy is six years old and he is much like any other six year old. He loves cars, trucks, trains and planes and he loves to play outside. Although he is much like any six year old boy, he is also very different. He was born with 22q11.2DS – 22q for short. 22q is a partial deletion of the 22 chromosome and it affects every carrier differently with a wide range of symptoms.
In Tommy’s case, he was affected with a heart defect, a cleft lip & palate, a laryngeal web as well as low muscle tone and developmental delays. He has been tube fed the majority of his life and he’s slowly learning how to eat on his own. Because of his many challenges, he has a very busy schedule. He has been receiving therapies multiple times a week since birth and he has had five surgeries to date. He currently goes to developmental school every weekday. In addition, he receives 3-4 therapies a week at home after school. He is very busy, but he continues to work hard like the super hero he is.
Although he has so much on his plate, Tommy is one of the happiest and easiest going kids I have ever met. He loves the movie Wall-E and his favorite past time is playing with his planes. He loves to snuggle and his best friend is his four year old sister, Rosemary. Tommy has a special way of making people in his life happy and he is truly an inspiration to everyone he meets.

Caleb Prewitt is eleven years old, born and raised in Jacksonville FL. We were surprised at birth with his Down syndrome diagnosis, but wouldn't change a thing now. He has a sister, a step-brother and step-sister who are all much older! Caleb is a student, athlete and advocate! He will "graduate" this week from Elementary school and head to Intermediate classes in the fall. Caleb has made trips to advocate for himself and others to both our state and national capitols. He loves to meet new people and loves to travel too. He and his dad enjoy working together in the kitchen and will soon hit the stage with a "Cooking with Caleb" event this fall here in Jacksonville with the Southern Women's Show. He's done some modeling, and is a Brand Representative for Jonas Paul Eyewear and JakeMax Apparel. He is also an ambassador for both AbleFinder and SaveDownSyndrome. He loves sports and participates in eight Special Olympics sports throughout the year, as well as Challenger League baseball and TOPSsoccer. We began participating with Special Olympics when he was just four with their Young Athlete's Program, which gave him the tools for the sports-side when he turned eight. His favorite sport is Bowling, followed by Equestrian. We are excited to help raise some funds for our local SOFL program with this partnership with Paperclouds Apparel!


Inspire

February 25 - March 10

This campaign we have a group of extremely talented artists. We hope you enjoy their work as much as we do!

Kelsey is raising money for Coastal Connections, Inc

Coastal Connections Inc. supports people with disabilities to achieve their full potential by creating personalized programs that promote living, working and playing in the community. Each person becomes an essential contributing member of their community through dynamic programs that create an environment which fosters life-long learning.

*We focus on the abilities of students, individuals served and staff, honoring their uniqueness and individuality.

*We offer creative and flexible program development and design that is responsive to needs of stakeholders through partnerships and collaborations.

*Our expectation is to seek and assume leadership roles in every aspect of our organization.

*We live, work, learn and play in the community and our presence in our community is mutually beneficial.

*We take reasonable risks that are of benefit to individuals and the organization.


Logan is raising money for Team Logan

As some of you know, Logan was recently diagnosed with a thyroid disorder. Medication is now a part of his daily life, and exercise is going to be a huge part of our routine moving forward. We are lucky enough to have an empty space in our home that we will be converting into Logan's fitness room, and it will be customized to his needs, likes and limitations. He has spinal issues, and therefore will be working with some specialists to make sure everything is perfectly geared toward his health and safety.


Justin is raising money for Community Outreach Program for the Deaf

Community Outreach Program for the Deaf (COPD) provides services throughout Arizona to persons with a hearing loss. COPD is considered a grassroots organization partnering with Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind persons and organizations in establishing services and providing a "one-stop" center for persons with a hearing loss.

COPD was established in 1973 as the result of grassroots efforts made by Deaf community members. Over the years, COPD has grown to meet the expanding needs of our clients, continually offering new programs and services. Now as part of CCS' Southwest Community Services, COPD is well into it's forth decade, serving hundreds of Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind persons each year. From the very beginning, COPD has maintained strong relationships with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing communities to help determine how we can best meet their needs. We pride ourselves on our strong relationship with these communities and value their guidance and support in creating new programs and services.


Tommy is raising money for The Miracle League of Johnson County

The Miracle League of Johnston County is a baseball league for children with physical, cognitive and/or emotional disabilities.
In 1997, just outside of Atlanta, Rockdale Youth Baseball Association’s coach Eddie Bagwell invited the first child with a disability to play baseball on his team. In 1998, other children with disabilities were invited to play baseball on a typical baseball field within the same baseball complex.

These players and their families expressed a desire to wear uniforms, hit and round the bases just like other team members. And so the Miracle League was born. Since then the Miracle League has received local and national media attention. The league has been chronicled in the local newspaper, televised locally on NBC, ABC, Connecting With Kids and FOX, Atlanta affiliates and nationally on CNN, MSNBC and Fox Sports. In July 2001, the league was profiled on a segment of HBO’s Real Sports.

Presently there are almost 300 Miracle League Organizations across the country including Puerto Rico, Canada and our newest member in Australia. The Miracle League is proud to serve over 200,000 children and young adults with disabilities.


Caleb is raising money for Horse Sense & Sensitivity

“Horse Sense & Sensitivity enhances the life skills and self confidence of special needs people by providing equine-assisted therapeutic programs and services in the Jacksonville Area.”

Horse Sense & Sensitivity is a 501c3 volunteer organization. Volunteers run the board, serve at every lesson as side walkers and leaders, help the organization raise operating funds and maintain the organization. Volunteers and instructors provide care for all horses used in the program. With no paid staff, we have very low overhead so nearly all funds donated go to operations including care and feeding of horses.

Horse Sense & Sensitivity is a non-profit organization that provides facilities and support for therapeutic horseback riding and physical therapy on horseback (hippotherapy.) These services are provided for physically and mentally challenged children and adults in the Jacksonville area.

Our all volunteer Board of Directors is comprised of community members committed to quality horseback riding instruction made available for all including those with special needs.
  • Artist

    Kelsey

    11 yrs old

  • Artist

    Logan

    25 yrs old

  • Artist

    Justin

    38 yrs old

  • Artist

    Tommy

    6 yrs old

  • Artist

    Caleb

    11 yrs old

Kelsey is an amazing young lady. Kelsey has her own set of special medical needs. She is 11-years old this month. As typical as she may seem, Kelsey was born with Biliary Atresia and had life saving surgery at five weeks old. Biliary Atresia is a progressive degenerative disease of the liver and bile ducts. Although the vast majority of BA patients require a liver transplant by the time they’re Kelsey’s age, she is defying the odds and still living with her own liver.

In addition to her BA, Kelsey has had to deal with extremely low bone density. She has had numerous fractures of her wrists, ankles, and foot. Despite all of this, she is an amazing young woman who plays in her school band and rides horses.

It’s hard to find Kelsey without a smile. She has a wonderful spirit that brings smiles to her family and friends.

Logan is a 25-year-old young man who is living with Hashimoto's and developmental disabilities, including Apraxia. He enjoys riding his trike, bowling, fishing, playing basketball and helping with his many, many animals. His family likes to consider him challenged not limited, and you can find out more about him through Logan's mom, Allyson, chronicles their lives on her Facebook page, The Crumb Diaries.
Logan's designs are raising money for Logan's Fund, a trust fund set up to be set aside for Logan should anything happen to his parents.    

Justin is 38 years old and works at a wood shop in a supported vocational program in Tucson, Arizona.  Justin loves to exercise, draw pictures, listen to music, and anything fireman related.  He is close with his family (especially his uncles!) and enjoys spending time with them while rock climbing and canoeing.  Justin has a dog, Koty, and two cats, Jacob Marley and Jordin Sparks.  Justin has a diagnosis of Down Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder but his disability certainly does not define him!!

Tommy is six years old and he is much like any other six year old. He loves cars, trucks, trains and planes and he loves to play outside. Although he is much like any six year old boy, he is also very different. He was born with 22q11.2DS – 22q for short. 22q is a partial deletion of the 22 chromosome and it affects every carrier differently with a wide range of symptoms.
In Tommy’s case, he was affected with a heart defect, a cleft lip & palate, a laryngeal web as well as low muscle tone and developmental delays. He has been tube fed the majority of his life and he’s slowly learning how to eat on his own. Because of his many challenges, he has a very busy schedule. He has been receiving therapies multiple times a week since birth and he has had five surgeries to date. He currently goes to developmental school every weekday. In addition, he receives 3-4 therapies a week at home after school. He is very busy, but he continues to work hard like the super hero he is.
Although he has so much on his plate, Tommy is one of the happiest and easiest going kids I have ever met. He loves the movie Wall-E and his favorite past time is playing with his planes. He loves to snuggle and his best friend is his four year old sister, Rosemary. Tommy has a special way of making people in his life happy and he is truly an inspiration to everyone he meets.

Caleb Prewitt is eleven years old, born and raised in Jacksonville FL. We were surprised at birth with his Down syndrome diagnosis, but wouldn't change a thing now. He has a sister, a step-brother and step-sister who are all much older! Caleb is a student, athlete and advocate! He will "graduate" this week from Elementary school and head to Intermediate classes in the fall. Caleb has made trips to advocate for himself and others to both our state and national capitols. He loves to meet new people and loves to travel too. He and his dad enjoy working together in the kitchen and will soon hit the stage with a "Cooking with Caleb" event this fall here in Jacksonville with the Southern Women's Show. He's done some modeling, and is a Brand Representative for Jonas Paul Eyewear and JakeMax Apparel. He is also an ambassador for both AbleFinder and SaveDownSyndrome. He loves sports and participates in eight Special Olympics sports throughout the year, as well as Challenger League baseball and TOPSsoccer. We began participating with Special Olympics when he was just four with their Young Athlete's Program, which gave him the tools for the sports-side when he turned eight. His favorite sport is Bowling, followed by Equestrian. We are excited to help raise some funds for our local SOFL program with this partnership with Paperclouds Apparel!


Keegan’s Krew

February 11 - February 24

Keegan managed to touch the lives of countless people. He was a smart, compassionate, funny, brave and creative child with an old soul. Even people who didn't know him as a person were left with a smile when he held the door open for them as he tipped his signature fedora. Keegan loved playing video games and reading, and had dreams of becoming both a famous Youtuber and an author. He loved super heroes and was working on his own comic book and super hero character, Night Strike. He emulated super heroes in his daily life as he tried to defend his fellow classmates who were victims of bullying. He even started an anti-bullying club at school. His many talents included being an animal whisperer and the self-proclaimed "Greatest Sandwich Maker in the World." To say he had personality is an understatement! He performed enthusiastically in school plays as both a cow and a dog, and managed to steal the show with no lines at all! Keegan was a world traveler, always ready for whatever adventure his family wanted to go on, but his time in Rome was his favorite. He hoped to move there one day after graduating from Bradley University like his mom. Keegan managed to touch the lives of countless people. He was a smart, compassionate, funny, brave and creative child with an old soul. Even people who didn't know him as a person were left with a smile when he held the door open for them as he tipped his signature fedora. Keegan loved playing video games and reading, and had dreams of becoming both a famous Youtuber and an author. He loved super heroes and was working on his own comic book and super hero character, Night Strike. He emulated super heroes in his daily life as he tried to defend his fellow classmates who were victims of bullying. He even started an anti-bullying club at school. His many talents included being an animal whisperer and the self-proclaimed "Greatest Sandwich Maker in the World." To say he had personality is an understatement! He performed enthusiastically in school plays as both a cow and a dog, and managed to steal the show with no lines at all! Keegan was a world traveler, always ready for whatever adventure his family wanted to go on, but his time in Rome was his favorite. He hoped to move there one day after graduating from Bradley University like his mom. It was the trip to Rome that he got his first fedora, and it was like his super hero power the moment he put it on. He relished in the smiles it brought most, and secretly hid the pain of the taunting that came from others. He began advocating for other kids like him, bullied for being unique, while silently suffering himself. He began a Bully Patrol, and spent recesses giving classmates a safe place to be themselves without fear of bullies. Sadly, Keegan ended his life at only 11 years old to escape his own pain. His family immediate banded together with friends and members of the community to continue his goal of Bully Patrol, and to share Keegan’s story to anyone who would listen. Keegan’s mom Kelly has spoken to hundreds of students at area schools about the effects of bullying. Keegan’s Krew has a long term goal of providing a safe haven for all, bullies or the bullied. In the meantime, they do pop up events to connect with community children, giving them an opportunity to express their feelings in a safe and accepting environment. This year, Keegan’s Krew will help their followers earn a Keegan’s Krew patch upon successful completion of 11 acts of Kindness.
www.facebook.com/keeganskrew1/
  • Artist

    Keegan

    11 yrs old

  • Artist

    Tytan

    9 yrs old

  • Artist

    Jeremy

  • Artist

    Be The Good

Keegan managed to touch the lives of countless people. He was a smart, compassionate, funny, brave and creative child with an old soul. Even people who didn't know him as a person were left with a smile when he held the door open for them as he tipped his signature fedora.
Keegan loved playing video games and reading, and had dreams of becoming both a famous Youtuber and an author. He loved super heroes and was working on his own comic book and super hero character, Night Strike. He emulated super heroes in his daily life as he tried to defend his fellow classmates who were victims of bullying. He even started an anti-bullying club at school.

His many talents included being an animal whisperer and the self-proclaimed "Greatest Sandwich Maker in the World." To say he had personality is an understatement! He performed enthusiastically in school plays as both a cow and a dog, and managed to steal the show with no lines at all!

Keegan was a world traveler, always ready for whatever adventure his family wanted to go on, but his time in Rome was his favorite. He hoped to move there one day after graduating from Bradley University like his mom.
Keegan managed to touch the lives of countless people. He was a smart, compassionate, funny, brave and creative child with an old soul. Even people who didn't know him as a person were left with a smile when he held the door open for them as he tipped his signature fedora.

Keegan loved playing video games and reading, and had dreams of becoming both a famous Youtuber and an author. He loved super heroes and was working on his own comic book and super hero character, Night Strike. He emulated super heroes in his daily life as he tried to defend his fellow classmates who were victims of bullying. He even started an anti-bullying club at school.

His many talents included being an animal whisperer and the self-proclaimed "Greatest Sandwich Maker in the World." To say he had personality is an understatement! He performed enthusiastically in school plays as both a cow and a dog, and managed to steal the show with no lines at all!

Keegan was a world traveler, always ready for whatever adventure his family wanted to go on, but his time in Rome was his favorite. He hoped to move there one day after graduating from Bradley University like his mom.

It was the trip to Rome that he got his first fedora, and it was like his super hero power the moment he put it on. He relished in the smiles it brought most, and secretly hid the pain of the taunting that came from others. He began advocating for other kids like him, bullied for being unique, while silently suffering himself. He began a Bully Patrol, and spent recesses giving classmates a safe place to be themselves without fear of bullies.

Sadly, Keegan ended his life at only 11 years old to escape his own pain.

Tytan is nine years old and lives with his family in Peoria, Illinois. He is a straight A student at the Peoria Hebrew Day School and currently has aspirations to become a fireman when he gets older. During his spare time Tytan enjoys playing video games, creating artwork and playing football among other things. Tytan has a great sense of humor and is always compassionate, understanding and respectful to friends and new acquaintances alike. Sadly, Tytan recently lost one of his friends due to an unfortunate situation. Keegan took his own life due to relentless bullying from classmates at his school. Tytan took this as a call to action and has dedicated much of his time and efforts into educating people, friends, classmates and any others that will listen on the damage caused by being unkind to others. Personally speaking alongside Keegan’s mother Kelly against bullying and always striving to set an example of kindness are things that Tytan has chosen to do in order to help others being bullied and prevent this from happening again. We can all learn from Tytan that everyone’s feelings matter and being kind to others makes a huge difference in everyone’s lives.

"Some people call him the world's greatest stay-at-home-dad artist. Others call him the Steven Seagal of pop art. Settled in the heart of Peoria, Jeremy has a love for a variety fandoms, is a creative writer, a self-taught illustrator, painter, and pyrographer. He has helped raise money for programs like Keegan's Krew, Kicks For Luke, and the nonprofit Peoria Academy. He had the honor of exhibiting art at the Keegan's Krew Kick Off Event where he met Kelly Beal. See his art at facebook.com/geekartbyzentner"


Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children

January 28 - February 10

Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation
whose mission is to provide social, emotional and financial support for families managing
the health and well being of a loved one with pediatric cancer. We pride ourselves on
providing practical support directly to families.
https://www.azcancerfoundation.org/
  • Artist

    Madi

    13 yrs old

  • Artist

    Owen

  • Artist

    Abri

    9 yrs old

  • Artist

    Nathan

  • Artist

    Ryder

    8 yrs old

I am Madisen. I'm 13 years old and I like to cook, draw, play violin, ride bikes and hang out with my friends. I want to travel someday to Europe and study abroad. I'm in the 8th grade and a member of the National Junior Honors Society. I want to be a cancer research doctor when I get older. I don’t have cancer, but it has been a part of my life since I was 7 years old when my mom was diagnosed with colon cancer. And then when my big brother Mason was diagnosed with a very aggressive brain cancer in 2015. I was 11 years old then. My birthday on June 13, 2018 was a very hard but special day that I will always share with my brother as it was the day he passed away. I drew a picture of children being lifted up to a place where they can feel the sunshine. I know first hand how much cancer can effect a family.

Owen was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma (Bone Cancer) at 6 years old. Due to complication from Limb Salvage he has endured over 100 painful leg surgeries causing him to miss half his school each year for the last 11 years. He worked hard to keep up grades and is currently a super senior finishing his final 4 classes for high school. To miss 50% of each school year and only be behind 4 classes is a miracle. Owen had served as teen spoke person for several charities and continues to give back in his spare time.

At just 7 years old Abri was diagnosed with Ewings Sarcoma. After 2 years of treatments and trials Abri is cancer free and thriving. Although due to the severity of her treatments and cancer Abri underwent an amputation below the knee. Now, 9 years old she has a passion for using her voice and experience to speak out and help kids just like her.

Nathan is the brother of Jeremy who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. While in high school Nathan also met and befriended Nick and became very close with him, when Nick was given less than a few months left to live Nathan dropped put of high school and assisted daily with Nick's end of life care. He later went on to graduate high school and complete missionary work in Bacolod on negros island in the Philippines. Shortly after returning to the states he married his wonderful wife Maddy. He is also a sufferer of a rare genetic condition known as elhers danlos syndrome. He is currently studying in college to hopefully work on the field of astronomy.

Ryder is 8 years old and loves art and Sonic. He has a heart of gold and wants to help everyone in need especially kids with cancer. He watches closely to what his mom does for work at Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children. He always wants to give or do something for the kids who are sick and stuck in the hospital. Ryder sets a perfect example of what kids can do to give back to their communities.


One Step Beyond, Inc.

January 14 - January 27

One Step Beyond, Inc. focuses on fostering all variations of art forms and making them available to our members. The goal is aimed at creating opportunities, and using the Arts as a catalyst for individual growth and community inclusion.

Our Core Values:

Increasing community awareness, knowledge and respect for people who have disability

Optimizing access to community resources and services

Creating partnerships to remove barriers and open doors to full inclusion within the community

Changing the workplace to incorporate the strengths and abilities of people who have disability

Maximizing opportunities and choices to promote optimal independence and self-reliance

Providing progressive, dynamic, and empowering programs and services to enhance the lives of individuals who have disability
https://osbi.org
  • Artist

    Malcolm

  • Artist

    Rhett

  • Artist

    Elizabeth

  • Artist

    Marcel

  • Artist

    Anthony

Malcolm is rarely seen without a pencil or paint brush in hand. He is well-known for is incredible attention to the smallest of details as well as his truly brilliant eye for color. Malcolm loves every art medium that he is able to get his hands on in The One Step Beyond Art Studio. He uses them all to create truly stunning works of art, animals being his favored subject. Malcolm has had his work featured at Art One Gallery in Scottsdale, Avondale Culture Pop Festival and currently has pieces on display at Sunsational Coffee in Surprise. He will be featured in the Artist Alley at One Step Beyond’s booth at Phoenix Fan Fusion in May 2019.

Rhett’s artwork can’t be mistaken. He is a popular artist around the halls of One Step Beyond, everyone knows his style and connects to his cartoon-style versions, often of themselves. Rhett loves to draw his peers and staff as characters in his artwork. It is a unique experience to be able to watch him work, the speed and accuracy at which he creates is overwhelming, he is like a machine! He has an intense passion for sculpting too, his cartoon characters often show up in his ceramics, they are just as cool, but in 3D! Some of his favorite characters are Sonic the Hedgehog, Mario, Mega Man and of course people boxing. In this image, Rhett has placed himself as The Boxer, he often creates self-portraits. Sometimes he will include himself with others that he knows, whether it be an already existing character, or possibly one of his friends.

Elizabeth discovered her love of the arts just two years ago after becoming a wonderful addition to the One Step Beyond Art Studio. Elizabeth’s favorite thing about art? “Well…Everything! I love to challenge myself and keep trying new things in art” Elizabeth would like to show her love of art to the world in hopes that others will enjoy her work as much as she enjoys making it. Elizabeth has truly blossomed in such a short amount of time already having her work shown at Avondale Culture Pop Festival last year. Her work will also be featured in the Artist Alley at One Step Beyond’s booth at Phoenix Fan Fusion in May 2019.

“Art is the most fun!” It is exactly this fantastic energy that translates into all the artwork that Marcel creates. While clay is Marcel’s favorite medium to use in One Step Beyond’s Art Studio, it is his playful portraits of his favorite animators surrounded by their beloved characters that he is so well known for. Marcel’s work has been displayed Art One’s Gallery in Scottsdale as well as last year’s Avondale Culture Pop Festival. Marcel will have his work featured at Wham Gallery in Surprise in August of 2019.

Anthony has been an important part of the Art Program at One Step Beyond for many years. He is a very talented artist as well as author and screenwriter. Most of the characters that he draws and creates are characters in his writings. Anthony specifies that “this character is part of a script in a movie that I ‘am writing inspired by the movie Wreck It Ralph about a cartoon sidekick”. One of Anthony’s many skill sets is to be able to recreate images that he sees on screen. He also loves to come up with his own images, characters, and designs as well. This is one of his original character designs who he has big plans for…stay tuned!


TCH Arizona Artists

December 31 - January 13

TCH provides services that support, care for and empower adults with developmental and physical disabilities. Services improve the quality of life, alleviate barriers to independence, and help Arizonans of all ages reach their full potential. We take pride in finding new and relevant ways to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities while promoting their independence and self-determination. Our dedicated and caring staff members work to encourage clients to make their own choices, gain confidence and control over their own lives, improve their abilities, and overcome barriers to quality living.
www.tch-az.com
  • Artist

    Jon

  • Artist

    Jackie

  • Artist

    David

  • Artist

    Doug

Jon has a unique style and knows what he wants. He demonstrates this through his art as well. He enjoys creative expression.

Jackie is an artist at heart. She is soft spoken, but her art shouts creativity. She expresses her zest for life through her color choices and unique creations

David demonstrates how he views the world through his art. He finds the good in everything. He likes to use unique colors to decorate his environment.

Doug loves life and adding his unique twist on common elements. He is very welcoming and social which he demonstrates this through his use of colors.


The Comeback Kids III

December 17 - December 30

Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

Our mission is to find better treatments and a cure for Fanconi anemia and to provide education and support services to affected families worldwide.

The Fanconi Anemia Research Fund (FARF) is the world leader in advancing research for better treatments and a cure for Fanconi anemia. Founded in 1989 by parents Lynn and David Frohnmayer, FARF has supported 232 grants to 74 institutions and 152 investigators worldwide. Over the last 29 years, our outstanding donors have enabled us to fund $23 million in research grants.

Mommies of Miracles

Mommies of Miracles is the world's largest virtual support group for mothers of children who have medical complexities, life-limiting conditions, or developmental disabilities.

The mission of Mommies of Miracles is to eliminate the isolation mothers of exceptional needs children experience on a daily basis by providing an extended network of resources, products & services, grief support, family matching, and hope.

Brooklinn
Brooklinn was born with profound hearing loss, she wears cochlear implants which are good in small groups, but large groups it is difficult for her to hear and she misses out on things. We are raising money for an FM system that connects her cochlear implants. Whomever is speaking wears a microphone and what they say goes straight to Brooklinn. She LOVES to draw, she doesn’t go anywhere without her sketch pad and colored pencils. When she’s not drawing she loves playing volleyball and is active in 4H where she is her clubs Historian. She shows chickens, cavy and rabbits. She also does sewing, crafts, photography and wood working. She likes reading Goosebump books and the Dear America book.

Cloud Covered Streets

Cloud Covered Streets is the brainchild of Paper Clouds Apparel founder and CEO, Robert Thornton. The mission and goal is to reach out to those most in need and help them with clothing, toiletries, understanding, and hope. What started as a personal mission in Phoenix, AZ has blossomed and we have street teams in Austin, TX and San Diego, CA. Currently, the goal for Cloud Covered Streets at the moment is to continue bringing in street teams and we are raising money for a mobile shower and laundry trailer. As we have been meeting more and more of the homeless, we want to be able to do more for each of them. They have told us how difficult it can be to shower regularly. We want to expand further than clean shirts and toiletry gifts into helping the homeless we encounter to feel normal again. No one is born homeless and we believe that providing a mobile shower facility with a washer and dryer will help every person we encounter to feel a little more hope inside. Please help us reach this goal so that we can make this dream a reality!

The “Bacon” Family
www.baconandjuiceboxes.com

Proceeds will be donated to:
POAC Autism Services

POAC is dedicated to helping children and adults with autism achieve their fullest potential by providing quality education, support and recreation at no cost to participants.

POAC provides free training for parents and educators; free recreational and support services to children and adults with autism and their families; and free training for police and first responders which, we are proud to say, has saved the lives of children with autism all over New Jersey.

Additionally, POAC supports ongoing quality research and promotes legislative issues that impact those with autism and their families. POAC is meeting the needs of those with autism in a very real way every day.
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    Emilee

    2 yrs old

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    CCS

    20 yrs old

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    Brooklinn

    11 yrs old

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    Mary Jo

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    Anna & Eric

    14 yrs old

Emilee loves music and painting. She can wave her hand and sign "please". She is a generally happy girl. She was born at 34 weeks with Nonimmune fetal Hydrops and she had a stroke inutero. Since the Nicu she has been diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia and spastic cerebral palsy.

This Cloud Covered Street design has been designed by a very special person that prefers to remain nameless. This piece helps broadcast one of the core messages of Cloud Covered Streets, to Be The Good!

Brooklinn is 11 years old and lives in Washington State with her mom, dad and sister. She was born with severe to profound hearing loss. By the time she was 3 years old she had lost all her hearing and received her first cochlear implant. When she was 7 years old she received her second cochlear implant. Brooklinn LOVES to draw, she doesn’t go anywhere without her sketch pad and colored pencils. When she’s not drawing she loves playing volleyball and is active in 4H where she is her club's historian. She shows chickens, cavy, and rabbits. She also does sewing, crafts, photography and wood working. She likes reading Goosebumps books and the Dear America book. She loves unicorns and her favorite movies are The Nightmare Before Christmas and Where the Red Fern Grows. Her favorite holiday is Halloween and she loves hanging out with her family and friends. Something that is very unique about Brooklinn is that she has two different colored eyes. One is blue and one is hazel!

I am a mother of three children, Israel, Isaac, & Mariana. Israel was diagnosed with Fanconi Anemia in 2010 when he was 1 1/2 years old and Mariana was diagnosed a week after she was born in 2013. Israel’s diagnosis was a huge blow to our family because just two months earlier, our nephew, who also had FA, passed away due to complications following his bone marrow transplant. Our family relocated from Oklahoma to Minnesota in September 2014 for Israel’s bone marrow transplant. He received his “bow and arrow” transplant (as he called it) on October 28, 2014 and he passed away 8 months later on June 28, 2015. He was 6 1/2 years old. A few weeks before he passed away, Israel told me he wanted to plant sunflowers. We were unable to grant this wish because we were not allowed to bring live plants onto the BMT unit. Since he has died, sunflowers have become a symbol of him and his continued presence in my life. I have seen them so many unexpected places and have received them from friends, both of which have been a comfort to me. And so, I chose to draw a sunflower for my artwork submission to you in memory of him. Like sunflowers, he brought joy and light to my life and the lives of everyone who knew him.

Anna Turning is a 17 year old full time student and competitive gymnast. She has grown up along side her 14 year old brother, Eric who was diagnosed with autism at age 2.5. She has been involved every step of the way, and has been his best teacher and therapist and also is his biggest fan. She didn’t grow up with the typical sibling experience, and many times has had to make sacrifices about her own wants and needs for the sake of her brother. She is wise beyond her years and has become a vocal advocate for autism awareness with her peers. She regularly volunteers in programs or initiatives for special needs children such as: gymnastics classes, buddy programs and even at therapy centers.

Eric’s favorite place on the planet is Sesame Place- and he loves hugs from his friends: Cookie Monster, Count, Bert and Ernie. At home, Eric’s favorite thing to do is ride his hoverboard. He loves water slides, and jumping waves in a pool or ocean. He just graduated 8th grade and has moved on to a new “high school” for special needs children.

You can read more about the family’s journey at Bacon and Juiceboxes or “Bacon and Juice Boxes” facebook page.


The Comeback Kids II

December 03 - December 16

Ronan Thompson Foundation

The Ronan Foundation is dedicated to raising awareness and funding cutting edge research for childhood cancer. We are committed to funding clinical trials to reduce the number of children affected by childhood cancer, increase survival rates and minimize long term medical and psychological effects of treatment.

We are committed to funding cutting-edge research to improve treatments for children with neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that most commonly affects kids under 5 years old. It is a super aggressive cancer with a survival rate of less than 60% with current treatment modalities. After initial treatment, there is a 50% chance of relapse and there is no known cure for relapsed neuroblastoma. New, more effective treatments for relapsed neuroblastoma is our top priority.

Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

Our mission is to find better treatments and a cure for Fanconi anemia and to provide education and support services to affected families worldwide.

The Fanconi Anemia Research Fund (FARF) is the world leader in advancing research for better treatments and a cure for Fanconi anemia. Founded in 1989 by parents Lynn and David Frohnmayer, FARF has supported 232 grants to 74 institutions and 152 investigators worldwide. Over the last 29 years, our outstanding donors have enabled us to fund $23 million in research grants.

Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA-repair disease that may lead to bone marrow failure (aplastic anemia), leukemia, and/or solid tumors. It is primarily a recessive disorder: if both parents carry a defect (mutation) in the same FA gene, each of their children has a 25% chance of inheriting the defective gene from both parents. When this happens, the child will have FA.

Scientists have now discovered 22 FA or FA-like genes. FA occurs equally in males and females. It is found in all ethnic groups. Research has added years to the lives of people with FA. Decades ago, children rarely survived to adulthood. Now, there are adults with FA that live into their 30s and beyond.

FA can affect all systems of the body. Many people with FA eventually develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FA patients are extremely likely to develop a variety of cancers and at a much earlier age than patients in the general population. Patients who have had a successful bone marrow transplant and are therefore cured of the blood problem associated with FA still must have regular examinations to watch for signs of cancer.

Common Threads Family Resource Center

Common Threads Family Resources Center, located minutes from Madison, WI, offers school and mental health programs geared toward individuals affected by autism, behavioral disorders, and mental health challenges. Our experienced and talented team of professionals creates a daily environment of acceptance and growth where students and clients flourish.

For more than 8 years, Common Threads Family Resource Center (just minutes from Madison, WI) has made it our mission to bring together the most passionate professionals in the field of autism treatment, education and mental health for the benefit of our clients. Our community of professionals offers many years of combined experience. Our multidisciplinary team includes top professionals from multiple treatment, development, and educational areas to ensure we provide the most appropriate and forward-thinking services for every individual client. Working collaboratively, we are far stronger.

Focus on Lyme

Focus On Lyme was started to improve diagnostics, treatment, prevention and advocacy for patients suffering from Lyme and associated tick-borne diseases.

Many stories of Lyme disease are similar with misdiagnosis and lack of proper treatment options while debilitating symptoms worsen. Many physicians simply do not believe in a Lyme diagnosis and patients are forced to pay out-of-pocket for treatments and medication, not knowing if they are helping or hurting. Even after patients are feeling better, they are unsure if they are healed or in remission.

The typical Lyme patient cannot afford to travel cross country to seek out care from a Lyme specialist. Nor the out-of-pocket costs associated with IV antibiotics and cash pay office visits. Many patients are so ill and tired they cannot advocate for themselves in an insurance system that does not recognize their condition.

Focus On Lyme was created to help all Lyme patients by making effective change within the diagnosis and management of this disease so patients maintain a quality of life.

Brendan Rare Heart

Brendan is a very unique young man. He is a sweet little boy in the body of a very old man. He was diagnosed with ostial atresia of the left main coronary artery and endocardialfibroelastosis (EFE) when he was 2 1/2 months old. He had his first open heart surgery at 3 months old. He has been through a total of two CABG bypasses, a stenosis repair and ultimately required a heart transplant just before he turned 2 years old. He has had five major heart attacks and has had many smaller events. He also has an unspecified form of dwarfism, chronic lung disease and chronic kidney disease. During the summer of 2017, he spent his whole summer break being tested and they found he acquired post transplant lymperoperative disorder (PTLD) and it manifested as large B cell lymphoma on his left lung in the same area where he has a lot of scar tissue from his never-ending pneumonias. For someone with so much going against him, Brendan is a kid who rarely ever complains. He is a busy and will go until he collapses because he just can't stand to miss a single thing. He loves to laugh and run and play. He likes to think he is a ninja and a wrestling champion. He wants to be a police officer, a firefighter, a trash collector, and a scientist. He has a wicked sense of humor. He has a passion for all foods that are spicy and puts hot sauce on everything. He'd probably put hot sauce on ice cream if I'd let him but I can't stand the thought. He has crazy dance moves he learned from his brothers. He wants to pretend he isn't sick.

As his mom, my whole entire goal now that he is finally getting older (when they weren't really sure he would make it to the age of 2) is to make sure he has a quality life. It is not realistic to think he's going to live forever because even now, behind his shining spirit and active life, his medical team and I are trying to control his blood pressure, his ability to breathe, and balance all his medications. The damage that some of his medications can cause his organs has sort of been held at bay but it's starting to catch up with him. I can't promise quantity, so quality is the goal. I would love to get a portable oxygen condenser for when he starts needing oxygen more consistently, heck, I'd love to get any equipment that insurance won't cover that will make him as mobile as possible. Brendan was switched over to a palliative model of care about two years ago because he's tired of being poked and prodded and he just wants to be outside the walls of the hospital. Palliative care gives him a voice that he wasn't allowed to have because he was "too young" and I was still living in fear of losing him.Palliative care makes it so he can go and spread his infectuous joy and courageous spirit with everyone he meets. He inspires so many people because he is able to just be now and he is just so cool. It's hard to stay in a negative frame of mind when someone so young and so sick can still be bouncing around even though, clinically he's nearly to the point where he could have a major stroke. He doesn't look sick much of the time and that is a testment to his powerful spirit. Brendan loves meeting people and anyone who is willing to get down to his level is offically good people in his mind. He is wise beyond his years and empathetic and just wants everyone to have fun in life with him. We are grateful to be part of this campaign to raise funds and awareness for other's trials and journeys as well.

Sincerely,

Brendan's mom,

Genevieve Davies
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    Brendan

    7 yrs old

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    Jessalyn

    14 yrs old

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    Sebastien

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    Carter

    9 yrs old

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    Maya

Excerpt from Brendan's Story: Brendan is a very unique young man; he is a sweet little boy in the body of a very old man. He was diagnosed with ostial atresia of the left main coronary artery and endocardialfibroelastosis (EFE) when he was 2 1/2 months old. He had his first open heart surgery at 3 months old. He has been through a total of two CABG bypasses, a stenosis repair and ultimately required a heart transplant just before he turned 2 years old. He has had five major heart attacks and has had many smaller events. He also has an unspecified form of dwarfism, chronic lung disease and chronic kidney disease. During the summer of 2017, he spent his whole summer break being tested and they found he acquired post transplant lymperoperative disorder (PTLD) and it manifested as large B cell lymphoma on his left lung in the same area where he has a lot of scar tissue from his never-ending pneumonias.

For someone with so much going against him, Brendan is a kid who rarely ever complains. He is a busy boy and will go until he collapses because he just can't stand to miss a single thing. He loves to laugh and run and play. He likes to think he is a ninja and a wrestling champion. He wants to be a police officer, a firefighter, a trash collector, and a scientist. He has a wicked sense of humor. He has a passion for all foods that are spicy and puts hot sauce on everything. He'd probably put hot sauce on ice cream if I'd let him but I can't stand the thought. He has crazy dance moves he learned from his brothers. He wants to pretend he isn't sick.

Sincerely,

Brendan's mom,

Genevieve Davies

Jessalyn is a 14 year-old freshman from the Madison, Wisconsin area. She enjoys listening to music, playing sports, participating in various art activities, and hanging out with her friends and family.  Jessalyn designed the skull t-shirt to help raise money for Common Threads Family Resource Center!

Sebastien Millon is an artist. His work is noted for its lack of vision and his art is usually muddled in a turbid stew of crockery. Many artists, art critics, and frankly most of the public views his work with great disdain and disrespects everything he is about (no one actually even knows what he is about, including the artist himself). Sebastien also has a blog, the following is an excerpt:  

Health History

Some of these posts are going to be incredibly self-indulgent. Talking about my health journey, my pain, my ...., my .... Part of it is, I think it will be cathartic for me. Plus I've been in such scary place with pain, that it is helpful writing about it and sharing. Maybe it helps me psychologically feel less scared, less alone. Maybe it gives me the illusion that I'm figuring things out. A bit of my health history, and how I contextualize my health situation: Pre-2005 Since I was a child, I'd had a variety of low level symptoms and weird things, but I could never quite put my finger on what was up. I was often times feeling uncomfortable or on edge inside my body. I also had quite a bit of insomnia, anxiety, lymph node discomfort, general body discomfort, vision headaches, very rarely sharp explosive pain in back of head, blurred vision issues, periods of manic energy and then total lethargy, concentration issues. These symptoms would all wax and wane in similar sequences together. At the time I chalked it up to my body's genetics and my particular personality and attempted to dismiss some of these things as "normal." Many of these symptoms I could mask, so no one around me had any idea that I was having any issues. Heck, I couldn't even describe most of those symptoms at the time, they were so vague and ebbed and flowed into each other. And even if the symptoms did worry me I was able to function at high levels, play a lot of sports, do high level academics, etc. I wasn't clairvoyant, but as the years dragged on I had an inkling that something was really wrong. It was like waiting for the other shoe to drop. I had no idea what form or shape it would take, but a sense of dread and fear began to permeate my youth. The symptoms seemed to be creeping on me, gradually becoming stronger, more noticeable to me. I'd always pushed myself intellectually and physically, I prided myself on that. I loved working hard and seeing what my body and mind were capable of, how much I could improve at things if I set my mind to it. I was blessed with a lot of opportunities, and I wasn't going to let them go to waste, regardless of what underlying thing was going on with my body. But once I got to college, I felt like I'd lost all my natural energy. I was losing my ability to pursue projects, maintain concentration, execute critical thinking like I once had been able to. This wasn't normal for an 18-19 year old. A deep exhaustion settled over my body. I started self medicating by drinking a lot of coffee, this would temporarily mask my issues but would aggravate certain things like my anxiety and ability to sleep. And obviously, with a thing like coffee, you are always needing to up the ante, increase dosage to chase those elusive energy levels. Sometimes I'd try to chalk up my issues to the stress of life, stress of college, etc. I hoped and wished stress were the be all end all, it seemed to affect a lot of people and I secretly hoped it was my main issue. Or maybe I was depressed or had underlying anxiety issues? except, I tended to have a very happy go lucky disposition, but my health was beginning to darken the clouds, for sure. Late 2005- At 23 years old, the other shoe finally drops. It dropped pretty damn far and hard. I fall ill with what seems to be the flu. Except this is no normal flu, my body seems to endlessly spiral into a hole of fatigue and pain, and I can't recover. I'm smothered by fatigue and pain. The fatigue seeps down to my bones. I had never ever been this tired. Symptoms I'd previously described from my youth all blow up in severity  (which is what leads me to believe I first contracted my underlying disease in childhood, basically the disease just lurked in the background for years). The pain in the back of my head and lymph nodes behind my ears is terrible and constant. I can't really even describe what was going on to doctors, my pain, fatigue, symptoms are all so overwhelming, and hard to pin down, they are constantly shifting like light in a prism. 2006- After many many many months of searching and testing in vain, the doctors (saw too many to count) eventually come to the conclusion that I had suffered mono and was now labeled with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Post Viral Fatigue. In hindsight, I now realize/theorize that mononucleosis was a trigger. It unleashed the underlying condition I'd had since I was a child, and if mono hadn't been the trigger, eventually some other trigger event would have taken place. Like I alluded to, I feel like my body's health had been slowly decaying over the years, the foundation was rotting, and it was being primed for a cataclysmic event. Mono was not the ultimate cause of my current situation, it was merely the surface trigger, and for many years we went with the wrong assumption that mono/chronic ebv was at the root of my issues. I ran into further complications, as one of the tests that was run in an effort to narrow down my diagnosis was a spinal tap. It ended up triggering even worse symptoms, burning neuropathy and burning head pain. I spent 6-12 months recovering from this pain, purely trying to survive the pain hour by hour,  day by day. It was the hardest period of my life (until now!). 2009- Having exhausted myself seeing doctors and never getting any progress, my family and I are recommended a doctor that one of our family friends (also a doctor) had met at a conference. Grudgingly I go see this doctor (I've lost all faith at this point of true help for my condition). This doctor specializes in research, namely looking at pathogenic etiology of chronic health issues like fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. After some pcr dna lab testing, I'm given the first clue as to what might be going on: the lab work indicates I have a protozoa called protomyxzoa rheumatica (it had no name at the time). Obviously I'm skeptical of this information but am also excited. This is the only lead I've had in 3 freakin' years! I also have no idea to what degree this particular thing could be causing symptoms. And why, after seeing a billion other doctors, has no one found this thing?! But hope reigns eternal, and at this point after 3 years of chronic pain/being bedridden I'm willing to try things that are within the realm of logic, even if they go against conventional wisdom. This doctor actually has a treatment: antibiotics! My mother and I had long wondered whether lyme or a lyme like illness had been behind my health issues. My symptom make-up certainly fit the bill, and the results of my Western Blot were indicative of lyme, but not conclusive. A naturopath I'd seen early on thought I should explore and retest for lyme, but the test is expensive, so I ran this idea by my doctors and they all nixed the possibility of lyme. I did not pursue further lyme testing. I also assumed lyme had an immediate onset after exposure, plus I assumed all lyme cases present with the bulls-eye rash. Given my lack of exposure at 23 to ticks, lack of rash, lack of arthritic symptoms, I was also skeptical of lyme. But discounting lyme, and other infections was a bit of a mistake on my part, as with many of these pathogens, lyme can lay dormant or lowly symptomatic for years. And lyme, and its variety of strains, do not always present with the classic bulls-eye rash, and certain strains of lyme present not with arthritic symptoms, but manifest with more neurological symptoms like the ones I experience. I did not know any of this. Nor could I research any of this as I was too sick. Anyhow, this new doctor puts me on an antibiotic, and lo and behold I end up herxing (herxheimer is a die off reaction, where after taking an antimicrobial one has a flare-up of their usual symptoms, and sometimes new symptoms. Can be hard to distinguish from an allergic reaction. It's hard to say exactly if a herxheimer is a reaction to toxin release from dying pathogen or due to increased immune response. Or both.). Herxing is often a good indication that there is an underlying chronic bacterial/protozoal pathogen. I make improvements, but I have to introduce the antibiotic slowly due to the herxing. Slowly and gradually over the period of about 6-12 months I see improvements, I'm no longer bedridden, constantly needing to ice the back of my head. I still have my core symptoms but they are less acute.  This doctor also recommends a particular diet, mostly plant based, low fat, which turns out to be very helpful. I get a reprieve from constant smothering pain and tomblike fatigue. So while still always in pain, body discomfort, I have more energy to think of other things like... DRAWING! 2009-2014 I continue on this mono-therapy. I survive, and make do with what health I have, but it is very limiting. I still can't exercise without engendering massive flare-ups in my pain and symptoms. Going out and hanging with friends is still very hard. I concentrate on drawing when I can, it is hard, it takes everything I have. I can draw fun simple things, but the more complex, longer projects are hard to plan and execute. The best way I can liken it is that my body always feels uncomfortable to some degree, and that my mind always feels like it's on a ship deck in a roiling sea, slipping and sliding about and never able to find its footing. I still have to expend a lot of energy to compartmentalize pain and fatigue. Usually mornings are when I have some energy, afternoons I'm shot, but the pain and discomfort are always there to some degree. There is a wax wane to my symptoms that I can't ever put my finger on, but there certainly is some sort of a pattern to how the symptoms increase and decrease in intensity. I don't know what other treatments there are for this, but I find a certain rhythm to life. A simple rhythm. I suffer, but nothing like before. I make peace with my situation. 2014- At this point I'm starting to burn out with my status quo. I can't put in the hours and focus to improve and develop my drawing. If there is one thing I value, it's being able to grow, having the ability to push one's limits. But I'm also getting tired of the pain and being so trapped in and by my body. A couple things happen. I finally learn the name of the illness I've been diagnosed with (the organism hadn't been named until this point). Armed with the name, protomyxzoa rheumatica, I start researching and coming across other patients online. I learn that there is a much wider array of therapies available, and that mono-therapy with one abx it is usually not possible to recover, especially in cases as severe as my own. What I come to understand is the abx I was on brought me along, but I had plateaued and further treatment would be necessary to improve. Often times protomyxzoa is not the only infection at work, therefore considering lyme/coinfections is not a bad idea, especially given my response to abx and my previous WB testing. One problem is that the testing for lyme/coinfections is not very good. In fact it is ridiculously weak and inaccurate and the big kicker is that these tests are mistakenly used to offer a definitive negative diagnosis to patients with high likelihood of these diseases. There are a wide variety of strains for borrelia, bartonella, babesia, and a whole host of other bacteria and viruses that could be working in conjunction with this protozoa. Our testing does not test for a wide variety of these strains, we cast a small net, and since it is antibody based testing, well that is very iffy given the fact that borrelia is expert at hiding itself from the immune system. I presume some of the coinfections are hard to detect as well, but I'm not as well versed on their ability to hide from the immune system. I think it is safe to assume it could play a role and thus devalues the antibody tests. We have much to learn in the realm of these infections, we are scratching the surface, and it will take time before we can begin to understand which strains are actually present, which strains are pathogenic, and then untangle the facts to understand which particular infection is causing specific symptoms and chronic illness. This is usually why a broad spectrum antimicrobial approach is best in treatments for these chronic infectious diseases, you need to try and cover your bases. An important question is why some people can harbor these infections and not get sick, while in other people it triggers unrelenting chronic illness. There is a good chance that some immune system issues are at play, and possibly with the right mix and amount of infections the immune system hits an inflection point where it can no longer keep a lid on things. We still don't know a lot of the mechanics behind what is going on in these chronic illnesses, but places like Stanford are pursuing and asking the right questions in my opinion (http://med.stanford.edu/chronicfatiguesyndrome.html). But I'll tell you one thing, I'm not going to wait around decades to have the research tell me what is going on to confirm things. I've lost a decade already to this health issue, and I have a basic ballpark understanding as to what is going on in my body. Can I tell you the exact infections at play and which ones are causing what symptoms? Nope. But I can tell you antimicrobial therapy is the only thing that has ever helped improve my situation. It's tough and difficult therapy for me, but given the pain I've gone through, and the rocky situation I'm currently in from the crash, it's still completely worth it and I regret nothing. I fully plan on continuing antimicrobial treatments (albeit in a very conservative manner) plus supportive therapies. Back to my story. Realizing I'm leaving health on the table, and desiring to pursue a grander treatment strategy, I go talk to my doctor, and he adds an anti-malarial medication. It is very effective, but my big problem is the nature of my herxing. It is constant. I introduce the med slowly, and over months, while I'm still exhausted and unable to work, I can tell it is reducing the swelling and pain in my lymph nodes over time. But the symptoms it flares up, especially the fatigue and increased pain becomes exhausting. There is a particular symptom that is very hard, where you feel wide awake but completely exhausted, and yet you can't sleep. I've read enough about these infections to find out that there is phrase for this, as it is a common enough symptom with these illnesses: wired-tired. Describes it perfectly. I also start introducing a variety of detox methods to try and control and manage die off, and also some herbal antimicrobials. But eventually I burn out, and in 2015 I start on a therapy that is only dosed twice weekly, but very effective and powerful. I finally start being able to leave the house more, but the herxing still messes up my concentration and focus. The herxing also gives my body a manic energy, I feel like a coke bottle that's been shaken and ready to explode. My sleep is messed up too. But wow, I'm amazed that my lymph nodes in behind/under my ears are so much better from a year ago, still painful, but so much reduced in swelling. I believe that the size of swelling in my lymph nodes is indicative of the toxin/pathogen load, and that over time, as the pathogen burden is reduced through antimicrobials, the amount of swelling in the lymph nodes also decreases. To me, my lymph nodes are a marker that indicate the level of the pathogen burden. It takes many months to see improvements, but they happen slowly through persistent treatment. By the summer, confident I'm feeling better, getting closer to remission, and more impatient than ever to see the end of this thing, these 10 years of hell, of being trapped in my body... I see another doctor.  I tend to agree with his philosophy, to hit these pathogens in the body's various systems you need a wide array of meds, plus this way you can cover your bases and hit other unknown pathogens that may be of issue. He puts me on more aggressive treatments, multiple abx and multiple herbs. I have this therapy vetted by multiple doctors who agree it is a good treatment, thorough, and that my health history warrants these treatments, as all indications point to a systemic infectious disease cause for my illness. It feels good to be coming across multiple doctors finally giving credence to my issues, recognizing there is something going on here beyond psycho-somatic or post viral issues. There is a serious active infection(s) that somehow needs to be gotten under control. In fact, meeting these different doctors who validated my experience, well it made me want to cry. I finally felt like I was getting help from multiple doctors who believed in my case and my experience, and who understand the depth of how disabled and debilitated I've been from this thing. I love doctors, but most mainstream doctors can't get past the fact that I look so healthy, they can't understand that something can be crushing my life with constant pain and fatigue if it doesn't show up on standard tests and I look so good (thank you very much ;). The patient experience is devalued in favor of lab work they don't even always understand! I don't fault them for it, they don't have time to stay up on all these weird ass chronic illness infections plus the research is still developing, not to mention the unfortunate controversies surrounding lyme/coinfections. This is why the psychological component gets examined and usually the doctors will run with that, it is the easiest answer to a complicated situation. As I like to say, my psychology has been affected by my 10 years of pain and fatigue, but it is not the root cause of my issues. The doctors whom I do have a bit more of an issue with are infectious disease doctors. I've met some wonderful ones, but on average, they are extremely dogmatic in their approach to cases like mine. Chronic lyme, chronic infectious disease syndrome? total bullshit in their eyes. They have a term for patients like me: crazy. That's it. Frankly, if I'd become a doctor, I have no doubt that I'd look at a case like mine and think the exact same thing. I'd probably just feel sorry for this young, but healthy looking man who must have serious psychological issues that he keeps coming to bug doctors proclaiming he has these mysterious and hard to identify infections. But for me, as with many similar patients to me, there are too many things pointing to an underlying pathogen as a cause for our issues. My biggest problem with the infectious disease doctors is the amount of disrespect they show to patients like me. They are completely unwilling to look and think outside the current status quo, they dismiss us out of hand, even as the literature is growing legitimizing cases like my own. Sadly, within medicine, changes can take a generation or two, even after the science has proven a new paradigm. Also, there are the mechanics of $ at play, and this can be a huge factor in how medicine is practiced, how resources are distributed, and what access patients can get to medicine. If our infections are legitimized, then we will have to open the floodgates to a hell of a lot of longterm antibiotic use. This is a dangerous proposition, and maybe this is part of the fear for infectious disease doctors. But that is no excuse to deny the existence of our cases and the strong possibility that multi-systemic infections are at the core of our issues. And if their main concern is the overuse of antibiotics I'd recommend they call for a ban of the sale of abx for use in our livestock. 80% of abx are sold to that industry and many issues of resistance arise from their use in this context. Not to mention compounding factors like influential infectious disease doctors and their ties to insurance companies and IP issues that end up muddying the waters as well. It gets rather convoluted, but agendas are not as always geared towards the patient and public health as one might initially suppose and hope. Back to my story. For a while, I'm doing ok on these new aggressive therapies. I mean, I'm herxing like crazy, pain in head, lymph nodes, fatigue, insomnia, but I am surviving. The doctor tells me to push through, but then, after about a month, I start feeling like my body has gone haywire. The pain in my head takes on the nature of a constant explosion. I'm getting burning neuropathy, and just wish I could jump out of my body. I have to stop all therapy as this is a hell I cannot endure. But there is a problem. After a normal herx, the pain subsides within a few days-week after stopping therapy. Here, I have unleashed something so deep, nasty, unrelenting. So this is where I'm at. I've been off all treatments for 4 and a half months. I have been inching back to my baseline, but the pain has been hell. Very similar to what I went through after the spinal tap. It is the most draining pain in the world for me, it grips me, in the back of the head, it is a burning that puts my whole body on edge and holds me hostage. This kind of pain really sucks, it reduces me to a child, scared and impotent, seeking solace and refuge anywhere I can, because I cannot find it within my body. A few months ago, the pain was 10 times worse, the burning neuropathy was killing me and I couldn't sleep. But I'm still struggling to survive the days, some days the burning gripping pain lets go, and I can breathe and think of other things. It is going to be like this for a while, the pain waxes and wanes, and eventually it will dissipate into a more manageable kind of pain. But trying any antimicrobial, even baby doses of things I'd handled fine before just unleashes things even worse. It is frustrating and scary to be off meds for so long. But I have to listen to my body. It is giving me no other options right now. Psychologically, physically, mentally, pain is punishing. And this pain, is a kind of end of the world pain, it is in my head, and it seizes me so hard and it won't let go. It really does hold me hostage and when it lasts days on end it feels endless and hopeless. I could never have believed such pain existed. I know I will overcome it, I will be able to resume treatments. But it is a long game, I'm having to be patient, smart, and careful. But I have to admit, I am very scared. The pain puts me in a place of great fear and exhaustion. Sometimes I don't know how I'm going to survive it. It is completely destabilizing and makes my body feel out of control and unmanageable. The new doctor I'm seeing, whom I just saw the other day, has said some patients do crash like I did.  That's what my original doc who dx'd the protozoa also said. They both say the protozoal infections can be some of the most brutal, in terms of pain and herxing, especially if there are multiple infections involved. Part of me is really angry. In hindsight, this new doctor I was seeing really pushed me to ramp up on too many meds too quickly, and he put a lot of pressure on me in spite of the concerns that I voiced. And yet, I'm even more angry at myself for not having been more careful, not having trusted my gut, I got carried away with the illusion that maybe I was in the final stretch run and I could handle such treatment to finish off this thing. Basically, I got impatient (after 10 years of hell who wouldn't be!), and I am most truly paying the price with this epic crash. But I had no idea this kind of setback was even possible, so I have to rein in my frustrations, and focus my energies on trying to regain my baseline and surviving this struggle. But I realize that I always have to trust myself, be smart, be careful, go slow. In the end, the ideal situation would be to be find a doctor who has at least 10 years experience treating cases like my own. Sometimes I wish I had more options for pain relief. But given the nature of my pain, I know that pain killers are a very dangerous path, and that would open a pandora's box that I cannot deal with. I cannot afford to add another problem to my health woes, and my intuition is that if I get on the pain killer bandwagon, I'm going to be in big trouble. They might be effective temporarily, but eventually their effectiveness will wane and I will be left with a serious dependency issue. So I have to manage my pain as best I can. I do a lot of heat therapy, including baths, dry sauna. For some reason these things give me a bit of relief from my body. The other psychologically difficult thing is worrying about not being on treatments for so long. I worry about the underlying illness progressing and I know my doctors worry about this too. Especially given the fact that there is a strong possibility these sorts of infections play a role in a multitude of neuro-degenerative diseases. That's what makes me scared and impatient, the worry of not treating and being held back by my body eats away at me. Ultimately, I have to look at the cost/benefit, and right now, the cost of not treating is not ideal but it is my only option, as the benefit of stabilizing my body is far superior to resuming treatments and spiraling my body back into a hole of pain I cannot manage. I'm so grateful to have my family. Without them I would be toast. I am loved, and have emotional, financial, loving support. I always prided myself on trying to be independent, and it has been very humbling to have to need and ask for so much help. To admit one's weakness is a difficult thing. To admit one's fears, how scared one is, that is also difficult, and my family kindly listens and helps me through my tribulations. I wish I could be doing more for my family, and not having to suck up their emotional and financial resources. At this stage in my life, I should be the one helping my parents, not the other way around. I do believe I can get better. Obviously I sent my body into a tailspin, and I need to recover and then resume treatments and try to go for incremental improvements. There is no fast way around this for me. I wish I had clearer answers, a clearer treatment path. When the pain is gripping for days, weeks on end, I start getting so scared, unrelenting pain begins to break me down. And on the days where that pain has tempered, I feel stronger, more hopeful, and I feel a bit more like things aren't spinning out of control. I know I will keep on my journey of healing. Do I know the exact path? do I know the exact endgame? no and no. But I know I can improve and I have to focus on that. I have improved things via antimicrobials but have had to go slowly and carefully, so hopefully I can resume that tact and keep recovering my health slowly. I never thought this would be my path. But in a sad way, getting better from this thing has become my life's work. I hope I can learn from it, and I hope I can keep finding the light and find ways to transcend this thing. But in the difficult moments, and when I'm in pain, I repeat a phrase a buddy of mine suggested: "May God grant me the strength to make it through the day." I like it.

Carter is an out-going 9 year old boy from Raleigh, NC. Carter lives with his mom, Crystal, dad, Josh, brother, Ethan, dog, Cassie, and hamster, Charlotte. He loves playing hockey on his roller skates in the house and tackle football with his little brother in the living room. Carter has Fanconi Anemia(FA) and was diagnosed at 13 months old. He was born with two holes in his heart, a hypoplastic thumb and missing right kidney. Right after Carter’s third birthday, his bone marrow began to fail. Carter went through 5 days of chemotherapy and radiation, and then he received his “new blood”. He had a matched, un-related marrow donor (bone marrow transplant) on February 5, 2010. Since his transplant, Carter has done well. He has had numerous surgeries, hospitalizations and setbacks, but always comes back with a smile!

Maya is Ronan's mother and she contributed two incredible quotes that remind her of her son. She was generous to share the story behind each of these special sayings with us. All good things are wild and free is my favorite quote by Henry David Thoreau. It stands for everything that Ronan was in his short little life and it is something I try to carry on for him in my life here. I try to live as wild and freely as possible knowing that tomorrow is never guaranteed. Everyday we are here is a gift and should not be wasted. "You keep me safe, I'll keep you wild" is another one of my favorite quotes. In my heart, I'm keeping Ronan safe forever. In turn, he is reminding me to keep going, to keep knocking down doors, and to keep fighting cancer for kids the non conventional wild way that he would want me to.


The Comeback Kids

November 19 - December 02

This campaign we have asked you what art you'd like to have revisited. We also asked each artist if they'd like to update the causes.

Justin would like his penguin art to raise money for The International Down Syndrome Coalition:

The International Down Syndrome Community (IDSC) is the foremost social media organization in the Down syndrome community. We foster the dignity and respect of people with Down syndrome with a focus on connecting, supporting, and empowering individuals with Down syndrome and their families from diagnosis and throughout life by providing online communities, collaboration with local and national partners, and connection to local support through regional events.

Logan's Dudebag design back out to help him with his needs. Half of the proceeds will go directly towards his medical bills and help him save a little for the future as he cannot find work.Team Logan:

As some of you know, Logan was recently diagnosed with a thyroid disorder. Medication is now a part of his daily life, and exercise is going to be a huge part of our routine moving forward. We are lucky enough to have an empty space in our home that we will be converting into Logan's fitness room, and it will be customized to his needs, likes and limitations. He has spinal issues, and therefore will be working with some specialists to make sure everything is perfectly geared toward his health and safety.

Maddie's has chosen to have her Smile artwork help the Shriners Hospitals for Children - St. Louis:

Every child dreams of being in the driver’s seat. But not all children travel the same road. For children faced with physical challenges, fulfilling the promise of a brighter tomorrow can be a long and bumpy ride. See how the specialists at Shriners Hospitals for Children — St. Louis are determined to put children in the driver’s seat and set them on the road to independence.

Since 1924, Shriners Hospitals for Children — St. Louis’s board-certified surgeons and staff have been providing high-quality pediatric orthopaedic care to children, regardless of the families' ability to pay. Our hospital and clinic specialize in treating children with orthopaedic conditions in an environment designed to put children at ease. Every member of our team, from surgeons and therapists to nurses and prosthetists, work together to ensure the best course of treatment for each patient.

The St. Louis Shriners Hospital proudly serves children from all over the U.S. and the world, but our primary catchment area is the nine states of Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Iowa.

Nick has asked that his Triforce raise funding for Make A Wish Foundation: Hawaii:

Every year, there are about 100 keiki(Hawaiian for children) in our islands newly-diagnosed with a critical illness. It is our vision to grant the wish of every eligible child. Learn about the transformative power of a wish and why medical professionals are prescribing it as good medicine.

We grant life-changing wishes to children in Hawaii with critical illnesses. Many of our wish kids overcome their illnesses and lead long, healthy lives.
Though we are part of the world's largest wish-granting organization, we operate locally as an independent 501(c)3. Monies raised in our state stay in our state.
We are headquartered in Honolulu with a staff of 30, and we rely on our 400 statewide volunteers to make wishes happen.
Unlike most nonprofits, we are 100% privately funded, which means wishes are entirely backed by our community.
We are among the busiest chapters in the nation with the unique privilege of sharing our beautiful islands with more than 1,000 families on wishes to see Hawaii each year. We engage more than 200 hospitality businesses to fulfill these incoming travel wishes.

Sean's Sun design will support The Hawk Shop at Higgins Middle School in Peabody, MA:

HawkShop at Higgins Middle School is a partnership between caring adults, students with disabilities, and typically developing peers formed with the mission to engage in social, vocational, and community based experience with a positive, goal oriented focus that will meet a need within our school community and support our school values by providing students-in-need with access to clothing, toiletries, and staple food items. All items are donated by the community and offered free-of-charge to those students.

HawkShop was started by a group of educators who recognized a need within our school community and found inspiration in other successful school based and local programs. We recognize that students have basic needs that must be met, and meeting these needs can improve students’ readiness for learning, attendance, social and emotional well-being, and confidence.

Higgins Middle School is the largest middle school in New England, serving all middle school-aged children in Peabody, nearly 1,500 students in grades six through eight. Student participants are members of our Higgins Middle School community. Special needs students learn vocational and social skills as they stock and maintain the shop alongside of their typical peers. All are students who exhibit our school’s values and who are motivated to enhance their own learning and social engagement as well as to support their peers.

Thank you all for your support and your votes for the art chosen for this campaign!
  • Artist

    Justin

    38 yrs old

  • Artist

    Logan

    25 yrs old

  • Artist

    Maddie

    14 yrs old

  • Artist

    Nick

    16 yrs old

  • Artist

    Sean

    22 yrs old

Justin is 38 years old and works at a wood shop in a supported vocational program in Tucson, Arizona.  Justin loves to exercise, draw pictures, listen to music, and anything fireman related.  He is close with his family (especially his uncles!) and enjoys spending time with them while rock climbing and canoeing.  Justin has a dog, Koty, and two cats, Jacob Marley and Jordin Sparks.  Justin has a diagnosis of Down Syndrome with Autism Spectrum Disorder but his disability certainly does not define him!!

Logan is a 25-year-old young man who is living with Hashimoto's and developmental disabilities, including Apraxia. He enjoys riding his trike, bowling, fishing, playing basketball and helping with his many, many animals. His family likes to consider him challenged not limited, and you can find out more about him through Logan's mom, Allyson, chronicles their lives on her Facebook page, The Crumb Diaries.
Logan's designs are raising money for Logan's Fund, a trust fund set up to be set aside for Logan should anything happen to his parents.    

My name is Madelyn Hubbs and my close friends call me “Maddie.”  I am 14 years old and my hobbies are therapeutic horsemanship, swimming, and knitting.  I live in St. Louis with my dad, mom, younger brother (Kyle) and our cat Elmo.  I was born without my left arm and I received my first prosthetic arm from St. Louis Shriners Hospitals for Children before my first birthday. St. Louis Shriners Hospitals for Children have continued to provide me prosthetics, show me ways to do things with one hand, provided strengthening exercises and monitor a slight curvature in my spine. My absolute favorite Shriners event has been Hand Camp.  I went two years in a row and I met many new friends like me and I got to try rock wall climbing and archery.  I always love going to St. Louis Shriners Hospitals for Children.  Everyone is so nice and many of the staff there are like family to me.  One thing I remember about going to my favorite hospital when I was younger, is I would always receive a toy or stuffed animal.  I decided a few years ago to collect toys and other items kids would like to have while visiting the hospital and as of this year I have donated over 1000 items.  A few years ago I became an Ambassador for St. Louis ShrinersHospitals for Children. As an Ambassador I have gone to schools in our community to talk about limb differences, prosthetics, and bullying.
I believe anything is possible.  I tell people, “I can do anything you can do, I just might do it a little differently.”  I am positive, have a great sense of humor about my limb difference and I am motivated to try anything and show others if I can do it, you can do it.  I taught myself how to put my hair in a ponytail, braid my hair, tie my shoes, knit scarves and hats – all with one hand.  I have recently made videos of these one handed tasks and placed them on YouTube and myShriners Facebook page, hoping to help others who are living with one hand like me.  As a result I have connected with people all over the world.  I am very excited to be able to help raise money for my favorite place, St. Louis Shriners Hospitals for Children. They have given so much to me and my family and I want to show my appreciation and give back.

Nick was an incredible, inspiring young man who showed thousands of people what it was like to truly live life to the fullest. At 14, Nick was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma after complaining of pain above his knee for a few weeks. Over the next two years, Nick underwent many surgeries and battled through chemotherapy with a positive, determined attitude every step of the way. Unfortunately, the tumors were continuing to grow and in late summer of 2014, Nick and his family made the decision to stop treatment. Through the next few months, Nick crossed items off of his bucket list with fervor and spent his days with his loved ones bringing smiles to the face of all those he touched. On December 30th, 2014 Nick passed away.
Half of the proceeds from apparel sold with his tattoo in this campaign will benefit the homeless and help the memory of Nick live on! People will continue to get Nick'd!

This is Sean Bowler. Sean is a twenty-two-year-old young man. Sean loves his family and friends. He shows his appreciation for those that care for him every day.
Sean was born at twenty-seven weeks. As he grew, Sean was not meeting his milestones. It was clear that he would need special education services. During his younger years, we were trying to find a diagnosis for Sean in hopes of better understanding his needs, development, and challenges. At six-years-old, Sean was diagnosed with FG Syndrome. With this diagnosis, our family started to make connections with other families with the same diagnosis. Sean’s geneticist at the time was not fully convinced with the diagnosis and after some time we started another search for a diagnosis. In the spring of 2016, Sean was diagnosed with Xia-Gibbs syndrome through genetic testing. At the time of his diagnosis, Sean was the fifth person with a confirmed diagnosed through genetic testing and the twentieth person overall.
As of his twenty-second birthday, Sean began attending an adult day program at Coastal Connections in Amesbury, Massachusetts. This program serves special needs adults of all ages and abilities. Sean refers to Coastal Connections as his “work.” This wonderful program provides academic and vocational opportunities for clients. Over time, Sean will have the opportunity work out in the community.
At home, Sean has his family. He is the older brother of two sisters whom he adores, Abby and Kelsey. Sean gave himself the nickname, Superman. To his family this seems very appropriate. Sean has recently had his third spinal fusion surgery. Currently, Sean is recuperating from this surgery and anxiously awaits his return to work. Feel free to follow us at https://www.facebook.com/Theboysmb/


Classics Collection

November 05 - November 18

We brought back fifteen of our classic designs and wanted the attention to be on them! So take a trip down memory lane and rediscover some great designs, artists, and causes.
http://www.papercloudsapparel.com/product-builder/?style=55642&artwork=6488&pa_color=neon-green&pa_size=m&category=classics
  • Artist

    Paper Clouds

Any time you purchase a Paper Clouds Logo design, 50% of the proceeds go directly to the charity of that campaign!!